VTU Syllabus Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester

VTU Syllabus Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester

VTU Syllabus Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester

VTU Syllabus Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester: With the latest VTU Syllabus Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester students get to know the chapters and concepts to be covered in all subjects.

The Syllabus for VTU Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester gives students a clear understanding of the course structure and its objectives.

Based on the score in Computer Science & Engineering degree, you can apply for better career opportunities.

In the depth knowledge in every topic of Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester will also helpful to crack the various competitive exams like Gate.

Here we are providing you the complete guide on VTU Syllabus Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester 2020 and Marking Scheme.

VTU Syllabus Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester 2020

4th semester is an important stage for Computer Science & Engineering. It is important to score more in Computer Science & Engineering for future opportunities.

To boost your semester exam preparation, you should have Computer Science 4th Semester books & study materials, Previous years questions paper along with the latest Computer Science 4th sem Syllabus.

Before starting the complete guide on VTU Syllabus Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester 2020, let’s check the highlights of VTU from the table below.

VTU Belgaum Highlights

Established year 1998
Approvals AICTE, UGC, COA( Council of Architecture)
Courses UG(35), PG(94), Ph.D & Research(592 departments) Quality Improvement Program(13)
Official website www.vtu.ac.in
Number of Students +325000
Collaborations Bosch Rexroth AG-GermanyVirginia Commonwealth UniversityUniversity of California

Deshpande Foundation-Startup Center

India Electronics and Semiconductor Association

IBM India Ltd. Bengaluru

Intel Asia. Bengaluru

Check the latest syllabus for VTU Computer Science Engineering 4th sem from below.

COMPLEX ANALYSIS, PROBABILITY AND STATISTICAL METHODS

Course Code 18MAT41 CIE Marks 40
Teaching Hours/Week (L:T:P) (2:2:0) SEE Marks 60
Credits 03 Exam Hours 03
Course Learning Objectives:

· To provide an insight into applications of complex variables, conformal mapping and special functions arising in potential theory, quantum mechanics, heat conduction and field theory.

· To develop probability distribution of discrete, continuous random variables and joint probability distribution occurring in digital signal processing, design engineering and microwave engineering.

Module-1
Calculus of complex functions: Review of function of a complex variable, limits, continuity, and differentiability. Analytic functions: Cauchy-Riemann equations in Cartesian and polar forms and consequences.

Construction of analytic functions: Milne-Thomson method-Problems.

Module-2
Conformal transformations: Introduction. Discussion of transformations: = , = , = +

, ≠ 0 .Bilinear transformations- Problems.

Complex integration: Line integral of a complex function-Cauchy’s theorem and Cauchy’s integral formula

and problems.

Module-3
Probability Distributions: Review of basic probability theory. Random variables (discrete and continuous), probability mass/density functions. Binomial, Poisson, exponential and normal distributions- problems (No derivation for mean and standard deviation)-Illustrative examples.
Module-4
Statistical Methods: Correlation and regression-Karl Pearson’s coefficient of correlation and rank correlation

-problems. Regression analysis- lines of regression –problems.

Curve Fitting: Curve fitting by the method of least squares- fitting the curves of the form-

= + , = = + + .

Module-5
Joint probability distribution: Joint Probability distribution for two discrete random variables, expectation and covariance.

Sampling Theory: Introduction to sampling distributions, standard error, Type-I and Type-II errors. Test of hypothesis for means, student’s t-distribution, Chi-square distribution as a test of goodness of fit.

Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:

· Use the concepts of analytic function and complex potentials to solve the problems arising in electromagnetic field theory.

· Utilize conformal transformation and complex integral arising in aerofoil theory, fluid flow visualization and image processing.

· Apply discrete and continuous probability distributions in analyzing the probability models arising in engineering field.

· Make use of the correlation and regression analysis to fit a suitable mathematical model for the statistical data.

· Construct joint probability distributions and demonstrate the validity of testing the hypothesis.
Question paper pattern:

· The question paper will have ten full questions carrying equal marks.

· Each full question will be for 20 marks.

· There will be two full questions (with a maximum of four sub- questions) from each module.

Sl. No. Title of the Book Name of the Author/s Name of the Publisher Edition and Year
Textbooks
1 Advanced Engineering Mathematics E. Kreyszig John Wiley & Sons 10th Edition,2016
2 Higher Engineering Mathematics B. S. Grewal Khanna Publishers 44th Edition, 2017
3 Engineering Mathematics Srimanta Pal et al Oxford University Press 3rd Edition,2016
Reference Books
1 Advanced Engineering

Mathematics

C. Ray Wylie,

Louis C.Barrett

McGraw-Hill 6th Edition 1995
2 Introductory Methods of

Numerical Analysis

S.S.Sastry Prentice Hall of

India

4th Edition 2010
3 Higher Engineering

Mathematics

B. V. Ramana McGraw-Hill 11th Edition,2010
4 A Text Book of Engineering

Mathematics

N. P. Bali and

Manish Goyal

Laxmi Publications 2014
5 Advanced Engineering

Mathematics

Chandrika Prasad

and Reena Garg

Khanna

Publishing,

2018
Web links and Video Lectures:

1. http://nptel.ac.in/courses.php?disciplineID=111

2. http://www.class-central.com/subject/math(MOOCs)

3. http://academicearth.org/

4. VTU EDUSAT PROGRAMME – 20

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS

Course Code 18CS42 CIE Marks 40
Number of Contact Hours/Week 3:2:0 SEE Marks 60
Total Number of Contact Hours 50 Exam Hours 03
CREDITS –4
Course Learning Objectives: This course (18CS42) will enable students to:
· Explain various computational problem solving techniques.

· Apply appropriate method to solve a given problem.

· Describe various methods of algorithm analysis.

Module 1 Contact Hours
Introduction: What is an Algorithm? (T2:1.1), Algorithm Specification (T2:1.2), Analysis Framework (T1:2.1), Performance Analysis: Space complexity, Time complexity (T2:1.3). Asymptotic Notations: Big-Oh notation (O), Omega notation (), Theta notation (Q), and Little-oh notation (o), Mathematical analysis of Non-Recursive and recursive Algorithms with Examples (T1:2.2, 2.3, 2.4). Important Problem Types: Sorting, Searching, String processing, Graph Problems, Combinatorial Problems. Fundamental Data Structures: Stacks, Queues, Graphs, Trees, Sets and Dictionaries. (T1:1.3,1.4).

RBT: L1, L2, L3

10
Module 2
Divide and Conquer: General method, Binary search, Recurrence equation for divide and conquer, Finding the maximum and minimum (T2:3.1, 3.3, 3.4), Merge sort, Quick sort (T1:4.1, 4.2), Strassen’s matrix multiplication (T2:3.8), Advantages and Disadvantages of divide and conquer. Decrease and Conquer Approach: Topological Sort. (T1:5.3).

RBT: L1, L2, L3

10
Module 3
Greedy Method: General method, Coin Change Problem, Knapsack Problem, Job sequencing with deadlines (T2:4.1, 4.3, 4.5). Minimum cost spanning trees: Prim’s Algorithm, Kruskal’s Algorithm (T1:9.1, 9.2). Single source shortest paths: Dijkstra’s Algorithm (T1:9.3). Optimal Tree problem: Huffman Trees and Codes (T1:9.4). Transform and Conquer Approach: Heaps and Heap Sort (T1:6.4).

RBT: L1, L2, L3

10
Module 4
Dynamic Programming: General method with Examples, Multistage Graphs (T2:5.1, 5.2). Transitive Closure: Warshall’s Algorithm, All Pairs Shortest Paths: Floyd’s Algorithm, Optimal Binary Search Trees, Knapsack problem ((T1:8.2, 8.3, 8.4), Bellman-Ford Algorithm (T2:5.4), Travelling Sales Person problem (T2:5.9), Reliability design (T2:5.8).

RBT: L1, L2, L3

10
Module 5
Backtracking: General method (T2:7.1), N-Queens problem (T1:12.1), Sum of subsets problem (T1:12.1), Graph coloring (T2:7.4), Hamiltonian cycles (T2:7.5). Programme and Bound: Assignment Problem, Travelling Sales Person problem (T1:12.2), 0/1 Knapsack problem (T2:8.2, T1:12.2): LC Programme and Bound solution (T2:8.2), FIFO Programme

and Bound solution (T2:8.2). NP-Complete and NP-Hard problems: Basic concepts, non-

10
deterministic algorithms, P, NP, NP-Complete, and NP-Hard classes (T2:11.1).

RBT: L1, L2, L3

Course Outcomes: The student will be able to :
· Describe computational solution to well known problems like searching, sorting etc.

· Estimate the computational complexity of different algorithms.

· Devise an algorithm using appropriate design strategies for problem solving.

Question Paper Pattern:
· The question paper will have ten questions.

· Each full Question consisting of 20 marks

· There will be 2 full questions (with a maximum of four sub questions) from each module.

· Each full question will have sub questions covering all the topics under a module.

· The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module.

Textbooks:
1. Introduction to the Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Anany Levitin:, 2rd Edition, 2009. Pearson.

2. Computer Algorithms/C++, Ellis Horowitz, Satraj Sahni and Rajasekaran, 2nd Edition, 2014, Universities Press

Reference Books:
1. Introduction to Algorithms, Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronal L. Rivest, Clifford Stein, 3rd Edition, PHI.

2. Design and Analysis of Algorithms , S. Sridhar, Oxford (Higher Education).

OPERATING SYSTEMS

Course Code 18CS43 CIE Marks 40
Number of Contact Hours/Week 3:0:0 SEE Marks 60
Total Number of Contact Hours 40 Exam Hours 03
CREDITS –3
Course Learning Objectives: This course (18CS43) will enable students to:
· Introduce concepts and terminology used in OS

· Explain threading and multithreaded systems

· Illustrate process synchronization and concept of Deadlock

· Introduce Memory and Virtual memory management, File system and storage techniques

Module 1 Contact Hours
Introduction to operating systems, System structures: What operating systems do; Computer System organization; Computer System architecture; Operating System structure; Operating System operations; Process management; Memory management; Storage management; Protection and Security; Distributed system; Special-purpose systems; Computing environments. Operating System Services; User – Operating System interface; System calls; Types of system calls; System programs; Operating system design and implementation; Operating System structure; Virtual machines; Operating System generation; System boot. Process Management Process concept; Process scheduling; Operations on processes; Inter process communication

Text book 1: Chapter 1, 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 RBT: L1, L2, L3

08
Module 2
Multi-threaded Programming: Overview; Multithreading models; Thread Libraries; Threading issues. Process Scheduling: Basic concepts; Scheduling Criteria; Scheduling Algorithms; Multiple-processor scheduling; Thread scheduling. Process Synchronization: Synchronization: The critical section problem; Peterson’s solution; Synchronization hardware; Semaphores; Classical problems of synchronization; Monitors.

Text book 1: Chapter 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.7 RBT: L1, L2, L3

08
Module 3
Deadlocks : Deadlocks; System model; Deadlock characterization; Methods for handling deadlocks; Deadlock prevention; Deadlock avoidance; Deadlock detection and recovery from deadlock. Memory Management: Memory management strategies: Background; Swapping; Contiguous memory allocation; Paging; Structure of page table; Segmentation.

Text book 1: Chapter 7, 8.1 to 8.6 RBT: L1, L2, L3

08
Module 4
Virtual Memory Management: Background; Demand paging; Copy-on-write; Page replacement; Allocation of frames; Thrashing. File System, Implementation of File System: File system: File concept; Access methods; Directory structure; File system mounting; File sharing; Protection: Implementing File system: File system structure; File system implementation; Directory implementation; Allocation methods; Free space management.

Text book 1: Chapter 91. To 9.6, 10.1 to 10.5

RBT: L1, L2, L3

08
Module 5
Secondary Storage Structures, Protection: Mass storage structures; Disk structure; Disk attachment; Disk scheduling; Disk management; Swap space management. Protection: Goals of protection, Principles of protection, Domain of protection, Access matrix, Implementation of access matrix, Access control, Revocation of access rights, Capability- Based systems. Case Study: The Linux Operating System: Linux history; Design principles; Kernel modules; Process management; Scheduling; Memory Management; File systems, Input and output; Inter-process communication.

Text book 1: Chapter 12.1 to 12.6, 21.1 to 21.9 RBT: L1, L2, L3

08
Course Outcomes: The student will be able to :
· Demonstrate need for OS and different types of OS

· Apply suitable techniques for management of different resources

· Use processor, memory, storage and file system commands

· Realize the different concepts of OS in platform of usage through case studies

Question Paper Pattern:
· The question paper will have ten questions.

· Each full Question consisting of 20 marks

· There will be 2 full questions (with a maximum of four sub questions) from each module.

· Each full question will have sub questions covering all the topics under a module.

· The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module.

Textbooks:
1. Abraham Silberschatz, Peter Baer Galvin, Greg Gagne, Operating System Principles 7th edition, Wiley-India, 2006
Reference Books:
1. Ann McHoes Ida M Fylnn, Understanding Operating System, Cengage Learning, 6th Edition

2. D.M Dhamdhere, Operating Systems: A Concept Based Approach 3rd Ed, McGraw- Hill, 2013.

3. P.C.P. Bhatt, An Introduction to Operating Systems: Concepts and Practice 4th Edition, PHI(EEE), 2014.

4. William Stallings Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles, 6th Edition, Pearson.

MICROCONTROLLER AND EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

Course Code 18CS44 CIE Marks 40
Number of Contact Hours/Week 3:0:0 SEE Marks 60
Total Number of Contact Hours 40 Exam Hours 03
CREDITS –3
Course Learning Objectives: This course (18CS44) of VTU Syllabus Computer Science Engineering 4th Semester will enable students to:
· Understand the fundamentals of ARM based systems, basic hardware components, selection methods and attributes of an embedded system.

· Program ARM controller using the various instructions

· Identify the applicability of the embedded system

· Comprehend the real time operating system used for the embedded system

Module 1 Contact Hours
Microprocessors versus Microcontrollers, ARM Embedded Systems: The RISC design philosophy, The ARM Design Philosophy, Embedded System Hardware, Embedded System Software.

ARM Processor Fundamentals: Registers, Current Program Status Register, Pipeline, Exceptions, Interrupts, and the Vector Table , Core Extensions

Text book 1: Chapter 1 – 1.1 to 1.4, Chapter 2 – 2.1 to 2.5 RBT: L1, L2

08
Module 2
Introduction to the ARM Instruction Set : Data Processing Instructions , Programme Instructions, Software Interrupt Instructions, Program Status Register Instructions, Coprocessor Instructions, Loading Constants

ARM programming using Assembly language: Writing Assembly code, Profiling and cycle counting, instruction scheduling, Register Allocation, Conditional Execution, Looping Constructs

Text book 1: Chapter 3:Sections 3.1 to 3.6 ( Excluding 3.5.2), Chapter 6(Sections 6.1 to

6.6)

RBT: L1, L2

08
Module 3
Embedded System Components: Embedded Vs General computing system, History of embedded systems, Classification of Embedded systems, Major applications areas of embedded systems, purpose of embedded systems

Core of an Embedded System including all types of processor/controller, Memory, Sensors, Actuators, LED, 7 segment LED display, stepper motor, Keyboard, Push button switch, Communication Interface (onboard and external types), Embedded firmware, Other system components.

Text book 2:Chapter 1(Sections 1.2 to 1.6),Chapter 2(Sections 2.1 to 2.6) RBT: L1, L2

08
Module 4
Embedded System Design Concepts: Characteristics and Quality Attributes of Embedded

Systems, Operational quality attributes ,non-operational quality attributes, Embedded

08
Systems-Application and Domain specific, Hardware Software Co-Design and Program Modelling, embedded firmware design and development

Text book 2: Chapter-3, Chapter-4, Chapter-7 (Sections 7.1, 7.2 only), Chapter-9 (Sections 9.1, 9.2, 9.3.1, 9.3.2 only)

RBT: L1, L2

Module 5
RTOS and IDE for Embedded System Design: Operating System basics, Types of operating systems, Task, process and threads (Only POSIX Threads with an example program), Thread preemption, Multiprocessing and Multitasking, Task Communication (without any program), Task synchronization issues – Racing and Deadlock, Concept of Binary and counting semaphores (Mutex example without any program), How to choose an RTOS, Integration and testing of Embedded hardware and firmware, Embedded system Development Environment – Block diagram (excluding Keil), Disassembler/decompiler, simulator, emulator and debugging techniques, target hardware debugging, boundary scan.

Text book 2: Chapter-10 (Sections 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4 , 10.7, 10.8.1.1, 10.8.1.2, 10.8.2.2,

10.10 only), Chapter 12, Chapter-13 ( block diagram before 13.1, 13.3, 13.4, 13.5, 13.6 only)

RBT: L1, L2

08
Course Outcomes: The student will be able to :
● Describe the architectural features and instructions of ARM microcontroller

● Apply the knowledge gained for Programming ARM for different applications.

● Interface external devices and I/O with ARM microcontroller.

● Interpret the basic hardware components and their selection method based on the characteristics and attributes of an embedded system.

● Develop the hardware /software co-design and firmware design approaches.

· Demonstrate the need of real time operating system for embedded system applications

Question Paper Pattern:
· The question paper will have ten questions.

· Each full Question consisting of 20 marks

· There will be 2 full questions (with a maximum of four sub questions) from each module.

· Each full question will have sub questions covering all the topics under a module.

· The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module.

Textbooks:
1. Andrew N Sloss, Dominic Symes and Chris Wright, ARM system developers guide, Elsevier, Morgan Kaufman publishers, 2008.

2. Shibu K V, “Introduction to Embedded Systems”, Tata McGraw Hill Education, Private Limited, 2nd Edition.

Reference Books:
1. Raghunandan..G.H, Microcontroller (ARM) and Embedded System, Cengage learning Publication,2019

2. The Insider’s Guide to the ARM7 Based Microcontrollers, Hitex Ltd.,1st edition, 2005.

3. Steve Furber, ARM System-on-Chip Architecture, Second Edition, Pearson, 2015.

4. Raj Kamal, Embedded System, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishers, 2nd Edition, 2008.

OBJECT ORIENTED CONCEPTS

Course Code 18CS45 CIE Marks 40
Number of Contact Hours/Week 3:0:0 SEE Marks 60
Total Number of Contact Hours 40 Exam Hours 03
CREDITS –3
Course Learning Objectives: This course (18CS45) will enable students to:
· Learn fundamental features of object oriented language and JAVA

· Set up Java JDK environment to create, debug and run simple Java programs.

· Create multi-threaded programs and event handling mechanisms.

· Introduce event driven Graphical User Interface (GUI) programming using applets and swings.

Module 1 Contact Hours
Introduction to Object Oriented Concepts:

A Review of structures, Procedure–Oriented Programming system, Object Oriented Programming System, Comparison of Object Oriented Language with C, Console I/O, variables and reference variables, Function Prototyping, Function Overloading. Class and Objects: Introduction, member functions and data, objects and functions.

Text book 1: Ch 1: 1.1 to 1.9 Ch 2: 2.1 to 2.3 RBT: L1, L2

08
Module 2
Class and Objects (contd):

Objects and arrays, Namespaces, Nested classes, Constructors, Destructors.

Introduction to Java: Java’s magic: the Byte code; Java Development Kit (JDK); the Java Buzzwords, Object-oriented programming; Simple Java programs. Data types, variables and arrays, Operators, Control Statements.

Text book 1:Ch 2: 2.4 to 2.6Ch 4: 4.1 to 4.2

Text book 2: Ch:1 Ch: 2 Ch:3 Ch:4 Ch:5 RBT: L1, L2

08
Module 3
Classes, Inheritance,Exception Handling: Classes: Classes fundamentals; Declaring objects; Constructors, this keyword, garbage collection. Inheritance: inheritance basics, using super, creating multi level hierarchy, method overriding. Exception handling: Exception handling in Java.

Text book 2: Ch:6 Ch: 8 Ch:10 RBT: L1, L2, L3

08
Module 4
Packages and Interfaces:Packages, Access Protection,Importing Packages.Interfaces.

Multi Threaded Programming:Multi Threaded Programming: What are threads? How to make the classes threadable ; Extending threads; Implementing runnable; Synchronization; Changing state of the thread; Bounded buffer problems, producer consumer problems.

Text book 2: CH: 9 Ch 11: RBT: L1, L2, L3

08
Module 5
Event Handling: Two event handling mechanisms; The delegation event model; Event classes; Sources of events; Event listener interfaces; Using the delegation event model;

Adapter classes; Inner classes.

08
Swings: Swings: The origins of Swing; Two key Swing features; Components and Containers; The Swing Packages; A simple Swing Application; Create a Swing Applet; Jlabel and ImageIcon; JTextField;The Swing Buttons; JTabbedpane; JScrollPane; JList; JComboBox; JTable.

Text book 2: Ch 22: Ch: 29 Ch: 30 RBT: L1, L2, L3

Course Outcomes: The student will be able to :
· Explain the object-oriented concepts and JAVA.

· Develop computer programs to solve real world problems in Java.

· Develop simple GUI interfaces for a computer program to interact with users, and to understand the event-based GUI handling principles using swings.

Question Paper Pattern:
· The question paper will have ten questions.

· Each full Question consisting of 20 marks

· There will be 2 full questions (with a maximum of four sub questions) from each module.

· Each full question will have sub questions covering all the topics under a module.

· The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module.

Textbooks:
1. Sourav Sahay, Object Oriented Programming with C++ , 2nd Ed, Oxford University Press,2006

2. Herbert Schildt, Java The Complete Reference, 7th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 2007.

Reference Books:
1. Mahesh Bhave and Sunil Patekar, “Programming with Java”, First Edition, Pearson Education,2008, ISBN:9788131720806

2. Herbert Schildt, The Complete Reference C++, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 2003.

3. Stanley B.Lippmann, Josee Lajore, C++ Primer, 4th Edition, Pearson Education, 2005.

4. Rajkumar Buyya,S Thamarasi selvi, xingchen chu, Object oriented Programming with java, Tata McGraw Hill education private limited.

5. Richard A Johnson, Introduction to Java Programming and OOAD, CENGAGE Learning.

6. E Balagurusamy, Programming with Java A primer, Tata McGraw Hill companies.

Mandatory Note: Every institute shall organize bridge course on C++, either in the vacation or in the beginning of even semester for a minimum period of ten days (2hrs/day). Maintain a copy of the report for verification during LIC visit.
Faculty can utilize open source tools to make teaching and learning more interactive.

DATA COMMUNICATION

Course Code 18CS46 CIE Marks 40
Number of Contact Hours/Week 3:0:0 SEE Marks 60
Total Number of Contact Hours 40 Exam Hours 03
CREDITS –3
Course Learning Objectives: This course (18CS46) of VTU Syllabus Computer Science Engineering 4th Semester will enable students to:
· Comprehend the transmission technique of digital data between two or more computers and a computer network that allows computers to exchange data.

· Explain with the basics of data communication and various types of computer networks;

· Demonstrate Medium Access Control protocols for reliable and noisy channels.

· Expose wireless and wired LANs.

Module 1 Contact Hours
Introduction: Data Communications, Networks, Network Types, Internet History, Standards and Administration, Networks Models: Protocol Layering, TCP/IP Protocol suite, The OSI model, Introduction to Physical Layer-1: Data and Signals, Digital Signals, Transmission Impairment, Data Rate limits, Performance.

Textbook1: Ch 1.1 to 1.5, 2.1 to 2.3, 3.1, 3.3 to 3.6

RBT: L1, L2

08
Module 2
Digital Transmission: Digital to digital conversion (Only Line coding: Polar, Bipolar and Manchester coding).

Physical Layer-2: Analog to digital conversion (only PCM), Transmission Modes,

Analog Transmission: Digital to analog conversion.

Textbook1: Ch 4.1 to 4.3, 5.1 RBT: L1, L2

08
Module 3
Bandwidth Utilization: Multiplexing and Spread Spectrum,

Switching: Introduction, Circuit Switched Networks and Packet switching.

Error Detection and Correction: Introduction, Block coding, Cyclic codes, Checksum,

Textbook1: Ch 6.1, 6.2, 8.1 to 8.3, 10.1 to 10.4 RBT: L1, L2

08
Module 4
Data link control: DLC services, Data link layer protocols, Point to Point protocol (Framing, Transition phases only).

Media Access control: Random Access, Controlled Access and Channelization, Introduction to Data-Link Layer: Introduction, Link-Layer Addressing, ARP IPv4 Addressing and subnetting: Classful and CIDR addressing, DHCP, NAT Textbook1: Ch 9.1, 9.2, 11.1, 11.2 11.4, 12.1 to 12.3, 18.4

RBT: L1, L2

08
Module 5
Wired LANs Ethernet: Ethernet Protocol, Standard Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet and 10 Gigabit Ethernet,

Wireless LANs: Introduction, IEEE 802.11 Project and Bluetooth.

Other wireless Networks: Cellular Telephony

08
Textbook1: Ch 13.1 to 13.5, 15.1 to 15.3, 16.2

RBT: L1, L2

Course Outcomes: The student will be able to :
· Explain the various components of data communication.

· Explain the fundamentals of digital communication and switching.

· Compare and contrast data link layer protocols.

· Summarize IEEE 802.xx standards

Question Paper Pattern:
· The question paper will have ten questions.

· Each full Question consisting of 20 marks

· There will be 2 full questions (with a maximum of four sub questions) from each module.

· Each full question will have sub questions covering all the topics under a module.

· The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module.

Textbooks:
1. Behrouz A. Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking 5E, 5th Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill,

2013.

Reference Books:
1. Alberto Leon-Garcia and Indra Widjaja: Communication Networks – Fundamental Concepts and Key architectures, 2nd Edition Tata McGraw-Hill, 2004.

2. William Stallings: Data and Computer Communication, 8th Edition, Pearson Education, 2007.

3. Larry L. Peterson and Bruce S. Davie: Computer Networks – A Systems Approach, 4th Edition, Elsevier, 2007.

4. Nader F. Mir: Computer and Communication Networks, Pearson Education, 2007.

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS LABORATORY

Course Code 18CSL47 CIE Marks 40
Number of Contact Hours/Week 0:2:2 SEE Marks 60
Total Number of Lab Contact Hours 36 Exam Hours 03
Credits – 2
Course Learning Objectives: This course (18CSL47) will enable students to:
· Design and implement various algorithms in JAVA

· Employ various design strategies for problem solving.

· Measure and compare the performance of different algorithms.

Descriptions (if any):
· Design, develop, and implement the specified algorithms for the following problems using Java language under LINUX /Windows environment. Netbeans / Eclipse or IntellijIdea Community Edition IDE tool can be used for development and demonstration.

· Installation procedure of the required software must be demonstrated, carried out in groups and documented in the journal.

Programs List:
1.
a. Create a Java class called Student with the following details as variables within it.

(i) USN

(ii) Name

(iii) Programme

(iv) Phone

Write a Java program to create nStudent objects and print the USN, Name, Programme, and Phoneof these objects with suitable headings.

b. Write a Java program to implement the Stack using arrays. Write Push(), Pop(), and Display() methods to demonstrate its working.
2.
a. Design a superclass called Staff with details as StaffId, Name, Phone, Salary. Extend this class by writing three subclasses namely Teaching (domain, publications), Technical (skills), and Contract (period). Write a Java program to read and display at least 3 staff

objects of all three categories.

b. Write a Java class called Customer to store their name and date_of_birth. The date_of_birth format should be dd/mm/yyyy. Write methods to read customer data as <name,

dd/mm/yyyy> and display as <name, dd, mm, yyyy> using StringTokenizer class considering the delimiter character as “/”.

3.
a. Write a Java program to read two integers a andb. Compute a/b and print, when b is not zero.

Raise an exception when b is equal to zero.

b. Write a Java program that implements a multi-thread application that has three threads. First

thread generates a random integer for every 1 second; second thread computes the square of the number andprints; third thread will print the value of cube of the number.

4. Sort a given set of n integer elements using Quick Sort method and compute its time complexity. Run the program for varied values of n> 5000 and record the time taken to sort. Plot a graph of the time taken versus non graph sheet. The elements can be read from a file or can be generated using the random number generator. Demonstrate using Java how the divide-and-conquer method works along with its time complexity analysis: worst case,

average case and best case.

5. Sort a given set of n integer elements using Merge Sort method and compute its time complexity. Run the program for varied values of n> 5000, and record the time taken to sort. Plot a graph of the time taken versus non graph sheet. The elements can be read from a file or can be generated using the random number generator. Demonstrate using Java how the divide-and-conquer method works along with its time complexity analysis: worst case, average case and best case.
6. Implement in Java, the 0/1 Knapsack problem using (a) Dynamic Programming method (b)

Greedy method.

7. From a given vertex in a weighted connected graph, find shortest paths to other vertices

using Dijkstra’s algorithm. Write the program in Java.

8. Find Minimum Cost Spanning Tree of a given connected undirected graph using

Kruskal’salgorithm. Use Union-Find algorithms in your program

9. Find Minimum Cost Spanning Tree of a given connected undirected graph using

Prim’s algorithm.

10. Write Java programs to

(a) Implement All-Pairs Shortest Paths problem using Floyd’s algorithm.

(b) Implement Travelling Sales Person problem using Dynamic programming.

11. Design and implement in Java to find a subset of a given set S = {Sl, S2,…..,Sn} of n

positive integers whose SUM is equal to a given positive integer d. For example, if S ={1, 2, 5, 6, 8} and d= 9, there are two solutions {1,2,6}and {1,8}. Display a suitable message, if the given problem instance doesn’t have a solution.

12. Design and implement in Java to find all Hamiltonian Cycles in a connected undirected

Graph G of n vertices using backtracking principle.

Laboratory Outcomes: The student should be able to:
· Design algorithms using appropriate design techniques (brute-force, greedy, dynamic programming, etc.)

· Implement a variety of algorithms such assorting, graph related, combinatorial, etc., in a high level language.

· Analyze and compare the performance of algorithms using language features.

· Apply and implement learned algorithm design techniques and data structuresto solve real-world problems.

Conduct of Practical Examination:
· Experiment distribution

o For laboratories having only one part: Students are allowed to pick one experiment from the lot with equal opportunity.

o For laboratories having PART A and PART B: Students are allowed to pick one experiment from PART A and one experiment from PART B, with equal opportunity.

· Change of experiment is allowed only once and marks allotted for procedure to be made zero of the changed part only.

· Marks Distribution (Courseed to change in accoradance with university regulations)

e) For laboratories having only one part – Procedure + Execution + Viva-Voce: 15+70+15 =

100 Marks

f) For laboratories having PART A and PART B

i. Part A – Procedure + Execution + Viva = 6 + 28 + 6 = 40 Marks

ii. Part B – Procedure + Execution + Viva = 9 + 42 + 9 = 60 Marks

MICROCONTROLLER AND EMBEDDED SYSTEMS LABORATORY

Course Code 18CSL48 CIE Marks 40
Number of Contact Hours/Week 0:2:2 SEE Marks 60
Total Number of Lab Contact Hours 36 Exam Hours 03
Credits – 2
Course Learning Objectives: This course (18CSL48) will enable students to:
· Develop and test Program using ARM7TDMI/LPC2148

· Conduct the experiments on an ARM7TDMI/LPC2148 evaluation board using evaluation version of Embedded ‘C’ & Keil Uvision-4 tool/compiler.

Descriptions (if any):
Programs List:
PART A Conduct the following experiments by writing program using ARM7TDMI/LPC2148 using an

evaluation board/simulator and the required software tool.

1. Write a program to multiply two 16 bit binary numbers.
2. Write a program to find the sum of first 10 integer numbers.
3. Write a program to find factorial of a number.
4. Write a program to add an array of 16 bit numbers and store the 32 bit result in internal RAM
5. Write a program to find the square of a number (1 to 10) using look-up table.
6. Write a program to find the largest/smallest number in an array of 32 numbers .
7. Write a program to arrange a series of 32 bit numbers in ascending/descending order.
8. Write a program to count the number of ones and zeros in two consecutive memory locations.
PART –B Conduct the following experiments on an ARM7TDMI/LPC2148 evaluation board using the evaluation version of Embedded ‘C’ & Keil Uvision-4 tool/compiler.
9. Display “Hello World” message using Internal UART.
10. Interface and Control a DC Motor.
11. Interface a Stepper motor and rotate it in clockwise and anti-clockwise direction.
12. Determine Digital output for a given Analog input using Internal ADC of ARM controller.
13. Interface a DAC and generate Triangular and Square waveforms.
14. Interface a 4×4 keyboard and display the key code on an LCD.
15. Demonstrate the use of an external interrupt to toggle an LED On/Off.
16. Display the Hex digits 0 to F on a 7-segment LED interface, with an appropriate delay in between
Laboratory Outcomes: The student should be able to:
· Develop and test program using ARM7TDMI/LPC2148

· Conduct the following experiments on an ARM7TDMI/LPC2148 evaluation board using evaluation version of Embedded ‘C’ & Keil Uvision-4 tool/compiler.

Conduct of Practical Examination:
· Experiment distribution

o For laboratories having only one part: Students are allowed to pick one experiment from the lot with equal opportunity.

o For laboratories having PART A and PART B: Students are allowed to pick one experiment from PART A and one experiment from PART B, with equal opportunity.

· Change of experiment is allowed only once and marks allotted for procedure to be made zero of the changed part only.

· Marks Distribution (Courseed to change in accoradance with university regulations)

g) For laboratories having only one part – Procedure + Execution + Viva-Voce: 15+70+15 =

ADDITIONAL MATHEMATICS – II

Course Code 18MATDIP41 CIE Marks 40
Teaching Hours/Week (L:T:P) (2:1:0) SEE Marks 60
Credits 0 Exam Hours 03
Course Learning Objectives:

· To provide essential concepts of linear algebra, second & higher order differential equations along with methods to solve them.

· To provide an insight into elementary probability theory and numerical methods.

Module-1
Linear Algebra: Introduction – rank of matrix by elementary row operations – Echelon form. Consistency of system of linear equations – Gauss elimination method. Eigen values and Eigen vectors of a square matrix. Problems.
Module-2
Numerical Methods: Finite differences. Interpolation/extrapolation using Newton’s forward and backward difference formulae (Statements only)-problems. Solution of polynomial and transcendental equations – Newton-Raphson and Regula-Falsi methods (only formulae)- Illustrative examples. Numerical integration: Simpson’s one third rule and Weddle’s rule (without proof) Problems.
Module-3
Higher order ODE’s: Linear differential equations of second and higher order equations with constant coefficients. Homogeneous /non-homogeneous equations. Inverse differential operators.[Particular Integral restricted to R(x)=eax , sin ax /cos ax for f (D)y = R(x). ]
Module-4
Partial Differential Equations (PDE’s):- Formation of PDE’s by elimination of arbitrary constants and functions. Solution of non-homogeneous PDE by direct integration. Homogeneous PDEs involving derivative with respect to one independent variable only.
Module-5
Probability: Introduction. Sample space and events. Axioms of probability. Addition & multiplication theorems. Conditional probability, Bayes’s theorem, problems.
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to: CO1: Solve systems of linear equations using matrix algebra.

CO2: Apply the knowledge of numerical methods in modelling and solving engineering problems. CO3: Make use of analytical methods to solve higher order differential equations.

CO4: Classify partial differential equations and solve them by exact methods. CO5: Apply elementary probability theory and solve related problems.

Question paper pattern:

· The question paper will have ten full questions carrying equal marks.

· Each full question will be for 20 marks.

· There will be two full questions (with a maximum of four sub- questions) from each module.

· Each full question will have sub- question covering all the topics under a module.

· The students will have to answer five full questions, selecting one full question from each module.

Sl No Title of the Book Name of the Author/s Name of the Publisher Edition and Year
Textbook
1 Higher Engineering Mathematics B.S. Grewal Khanna Publishers 43rd Edition, 2015
Reference Books
1 Advanced Engineering Mathematics E. Kreyszig John Wiley & Sons 10th Edition, 2015
2 Engineering Mathematics N. P. Bali and Manish Goyal Laxmi Publishers 7th Edition, 2007
3 Engineering Mathematics Vol. I Rohit Khurana Cengage Learning 1st Edition, 2015

We have covered the complete guide on VTU Syllabus Computer Science & Engineering 4th Semester 2020. Feel free to ask us any questions in the comment section below.

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