Biofertilizer Technology

Biofertilizer Technology
44% Off

Biofertilizer Technology

317 Views
Publisher: Agrotech Publications
ISBN: 9788185680903
Author:
Availability: In Stock
INR 1,500.00 INR 840.00 ( 44% Off )
Effective Price after using Coupon Code: SAVE20
Download & Read Books Offline (Desktop/Laptop/Android Device) :
Customers who Bought this Ebook also Bought
  • Snapshot
  • Description

About this eBook

PREFACE Biofertilisers refers to preparations containing primarily active strains of microorganisms bacteria, fungi, yeast, algae, etc. in sufficient numbers capable of fixing either atmospheric nitrogen or solubilizing mobilizing phosphorus which is otherwise not available or inaccessible to growing plants. Despite spectacular progress in the production and use of fertilisers the world over to meet increasing demand, the industry has to increasingly bear the escalating costs of raw material, most of which being non-renewable in nature. At this stage, when accelerated agricultural development required further thrust, in many parts of the world it is becoming difficult to meet the nutrient needs of farming through chemical fertilizers alone. This has in turn paved the way for Integrated Plant Nutrition involving judicious and integrated use of. chemical synthetic sources of nutrients along with biofertilizers and nutrients through crop residue recycling, organic manures, green manuring and wastes etc. Only bifertilizers are based on renewable energy sources besides being cheaper and environment friendly, among all the non-mineral sources of nutrients. Biofertilizers can play a very significant role in improving soil fertility by fixing atmospheric nitrogen besides solubilising accessing phosphate not available inaccessible to plants. They also produce growth substances in the rhizosphere. In fact even today biologically fixed nitrogen on the earth far exceeds the industrially fixed nitrogen. Rice is the staple food of more than 60 of the world s population and is the most widely cultivated crop throughout the tropics. About two thirds of the 145 million hectares of rice land in the world are used for wetland rice culture in which water from irrigation sources is conserved in the field to maintain a shallow flooded condition for almost the entire duration of the crop. Flooding has beneficial effects on rice cultivation particularly in increasing the availability of nutrients and stimulating nitrogen fixation process. Flooded soils used for rice production maintains a degree of nitrogen fertility as a result of nitrogen fixation. The introduction of new high yielding rice varieties have increased the demand for nitrogen in rice production. The use of mineral fertilizer is the quickest and surest way of boosting crop production, but their exorbitant cost and other constraints frequently deter farmers from using them in recommended quantities and in balanced proportions. As a consequence of this and ecological constraints there seems to be no option but to fully exploit potential "alternative sources of plant nutrients
4 along with mineral fertilizers to maintain soil productivity. The nitrogen requirement of rice crop could be met partially by increasing the activity of biological nitrogen fixation in rice soil. The main agents of biological nitrogen fixation in a rice field are free-living blue green algae and symbiotic blue green alga with azolla. Azolla is a genus of water fern that assimilates nitrogen in association with nitrogen fixing blue green alga Anabaena azollae. The symbiotic association between the eukaryotic water fern azolla and its prokaryotic cyanobaterial