Virus Diseases of Plants

Virus Diseases of Plants
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Virus Diseases of Plants

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Publisher: Agrobios Publications
ISBN: 9788177544930
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PREFACE Viruses are obligate parasites that is, they require a living host in order to grow and multiply. Once in a wounded cell, the virus particle sheds its protein coat and the nucleic acid then directs the production of multiple copies of itself and related proteins leading to the development of new virus particles. Cell-to-cell movement of plant viruses occurs through the cytoplasmic bridges between cells called plasmodesmata and move systemically throughout infected plants via the phloem. Although the details of plant virus replication are complex and beyond the scope of this fact sheet, the general idea is that plant viruses cause disease in part by causing a reallocation of photosynthates and a disruption of normal cellular processes as they replicate. Interestingly, many kinds of plants are infected with viruses and show no symptoms. Such infections are referred to as being latent. Some viruses, such as cucumber mosaic virus CMV and cowpea mosaic virus CPMV , occur as a complex of multiple component particles, each containing different nucleic acid cores. In multi-component viruses, all components have to be present in a plant for infection and replication to take place. Viruses are difficult to classify and, for want of anything better, they are given descriptive and sometimes colorful names based on the disease they cause, for example, tobacco ring spot, watermelon mosaic, barley yellow dwarf, potato mop top, citrus tristeza, sugar beet curly top, lettuce mosaic, maize dwarf mosaic, potato leaf roll, peach yellow bud mosaic, African cassava mosaic, carnation streak, and tomato spotted wilt. Many of these viruses also infect plants of other species. For example, tobacco ring spot virus causes a bud blight in soybeans maize dwarf mosaic infects sorghum. The present book is an attempt to give an bird-eye scenario to plant virus diseases. The book include chapters Introduction, Characteristics of Viruses, Classification of Viruses, Structure and Composition of Viruses, Virus Purification and Assays, Transmission of Viral Diseases, The Relation of a Virus to its Host Plant, Histology and Cytology of Virus Diseased Plant, Properties of The Virus Extract, Economic Effects and Measures of Control General , Virus Diseases of Food Crops, Virus Diseases of Vegetables, Virus Diseases of Industrial Plants, Virus Diseases of Fruits, Virus Diseases of Legume Vegetables, Virus Diseases of Spices, Virus Diseases of Mushrooms, Virus Diseases of
Ornamental and Medicinal Plants, Virus Diseases of Forage Feed Plants, Virus Diseases of Minor Importance, Some other Viruses Reported on Alfalfa Grasses . I am thankful to Dr. S. S. Purohit in helping me in various ways. Author
CONTENTS 1
Introduction...................................................................................... 1 Historical ........................................................................................................... 1 Pioneers in the Filed of Plant Virology ............................................................ 5 Work Done in India........................................................................................... 6
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